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Summer Holiday is the Final Straw for Fragile Relationships

View profile for Jonathan Corbishley
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Throughout the country many family lawyers will be readying themselves for one of the busiest times of the year following disastrous summer holidays.

It is estimated that more than 40 per cent of marriages end in divorce, and it is following the summer break and Christmas period, that sees the largest increase in couples separating.

It is a pattern that is very common when marriages are already rocky, as it is often the case that one of the parties decides to start divorce proceedings following one of these stressful holidays. Sadly, this is happening at a time that should be for happy couples and families to make wonderful memories.

Legal firms experience an increase in enquiries following the summer holidays, which is not surprising as during the summer break couples have been in each other’s company more than usual. This can cause excessive strain and tension where relationships are already struggling and as soon as normal working life recommences couples realise it’s decision time about their future together.

One thing we can say for sure is that despite many years of family law expertise there is no set formula or reason as to why and when marriages fail.

Some marriages can struggle on for many years before couples go their separate ways, but sometimes a marriage can fall apart in a way or with such suddenness that it leaves close family and friends shocked by it. However, there are certain times of the year where there is a predictable pattern and we are approaching one of those times now.

As family lawyers, we understand that life is complex, especially in our 24/7, demanding world, and we recommend that those involved in a potential marriage breakdown seek support and legal advice as soon as they can. No one goes into marriage with the intention for it to fail, but getting the right advice can mean that from a breakdown, both parties are able to move on more amicably and quickly if the worst does happen.

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